From the Archives (but not my archives)

 TNA-B&W

The documents spilled out onto the table like the dusty entrails of some juridical shark. This archival immortality preserved the acts of violence and legal manipulations of a dozen noble gentry. He leaned over the ancient indictment:

…felonice interfecerunt et murdraverunt…

The thought occurred to him that one were careless enough to be caught, this was a nice way to become part of the fabric of history. But he had been very careful, and it saddened him to think of students not yet born, cursing the nameless perpetrator of some insignificant murder, unrecorded in the archives. The feeling quickly faded. (Oxford Noir: Close Roll, Open Corpse)

 

Cloud Koo Kew Land?

I hope regular readers of PBS have enjoyed, or at least tolerated, the brief take over by the ether-monkeys of WordPress with their occasional postings from Oxford Noir. I have been trapped in a different sort of Dante-esque place of confinement at The National Archives for the last week and, prior to that, the victim of some wicked ennui that made all non-essential writing a painful ordeal. I will, given time, actually write about my adventures but for now I will simply check in and deposit this fragment from the second volume in the Oxford Noir series, unfortunately titled Close Roll and Open Corpse (somehow, this one didn’t impress the literary agents either).

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Curious Kew

I will be away from convenient internets for the next week while I enjoy a paid vacation at the charming Kew Gardens. Actually, I will be at the National Archives at Kew, which is not, by any stretch of the imagination, a charming vacation destination. It is true that my time there is paid-for. Thank you AHRC and the Institute of Historical Research.

I have scheduled some short selections from Oxford Noir to entertain and horrify my loyal readers.